S.N. (Sabrina) Autenrieth



Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 2727
E-Mail: s.n.autenrieth@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Faculty / Department: Faculteit Archeologie, World Archaeology, European Prehistory
Office Address: Van Steenis gebouw
Einsteinweg 2
2333 CC Leiden
Room number FLEX


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VICI Project: Economies of Destruction. The emergence of metalwork deposition during the Bronze Age in Northwest Europe, c. 2300-1500 BC.

Sabrina N. Autenrieth studied Pre- and Protohistory at Kiel University (Germany) specializing in Neolithic house structures, megaliths and material culture. During her studies, she worked as a graduate/research assistant and led a tutorial about ‘Research history and methods of Pre- and Protohistory’. She also took part in several excavations and archaeological surveys in Germany, Scotland, Slovakia, Serbia, Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

After her graduation in April 2015, Sabrina worked as a scientific guide for an educational journey to Scotland and attended an international archaeological workshop in Bolgar (Kazan Federal University/Russia) about ‘Experimental Trace Analysis on Tools’. Since April 2015 she is also a member of the Reviewing Team 'International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology' (IJSRA).

In September 2015 Sabrina started her PhD research in Leiden about Bronze Age metalwork depositions in the broader Middle Rhine Valley in Germany and France. She will be analyzing if there is a fundamental difference between the deposition of metal in rivers and dry areas.

The middle Rhine region is one of the best known examples of the excessive use of depositional practices of valuable objects in rivers. To understand this phenomenon, we have to change our focus from the river itself and their back swamps to the adjacent area in the German and French hinterland. In this region, we have the opportunity to compare a variety of depositional practices in wet and in dry contexts that have so far never been studied together. This will not only readjust the previous one-sided focus on river finds, but also reveal whether objects deposited in arid lands represent a practice steered by ideas and motivations contrasting from those of river depositions.

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Last Modified: 01-02-2016