ms. Dr. M.E.J.J. (Marike) van Aerde



Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 1998
E-Mail: m.e.j.j.van.aerde@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Faculty / Department: Faculteit Archeologie, World Archaeology, Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology
Office Address: Van Steenis gebouw
Einsteinweg 2
2333 CC Leiden
Room number B1.03
Telephone number: +31 (0)71 527 1998
E-Mail: m.e.j.j.van.aerde@arch.leidenuniv.nl
Faculty / Department: Faculteit Archeologie, World Archaeology, Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology
Office Address: Van Steenis gebouw
Einsteinweg 2
2333 CC Leiden
Room number B1.03


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Current research (postdoc) explores culture contact between the Greek and Roman West and the ancient Far East, with focus on a new analysis of the archaeological record of ‘Greco-Buddhist' art and its development across Central and Far East Asia from the 2nd Century BCE to the 4th Century CE, based on new case studies as well as a reappraisal of existing data in the context of global archaeology and cultural interaction. The project aims to comprise a comprehensive overview as well as new analysis of ‘Greco-Buddhist’ material culture, focused especially on the question what role Greek and Roman elements played in its development. The theoretical framework relies on current research in globalisation processes and multiculturalism in the ancient world. Within that framework, an object-focused method will be adopted to study the archaeological data. The ‘Greco-Buddhist’ category is traditionally applied in terms of ethnicity and/or culture, which has led to many incorrect interpretations of the archaeological record. In contrast, this project develops a new interpretation focused on flexibility and appropriation, based on the analysis of the empirical data. Preliminary research will be conducted throughout 2015-2016, in collaboration with The British Museum in London, concerning a case study from North India.

As part of the VIDI team 'Cultural innovation in a globalising society: Egypt in the Roman world' at Leiden University, Marike’s PhD project (2015) explored manifestations of Egypt in the material culture of the city of Rome during the Augustan period. By focusing on the archaeological data, her dissertation ‘Egypt and the Augustan Cultural Revolution: an interpretative archaeological overview’ demonstrated that Egypt was not an exotic Outsider in Rome, but constituted a remarkably diverse and integral part of the Roman material culture repertoire. Fieldwork included campaigns at the Palatine Hill in Rome and object studies in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Archeologica di Roma, the Royal Dutch Institute in Rome (KNIR), and The British Museum in London. The research was generously supported by scholarships from the Royal Dutch Institute in Rome (KNIR) and the Prince Bernhard Culture Fund for the Arts and Sciences.

Marike also holds a (cum laude) MA degree in Classics and Archaeology from Radboud University (2005), and was awarded the Graduate School Research Scholarship from University College London (UCL, 2005-2008). Also active in the arts, she wrote the original libretto for The Mirror, a new opera by British-Bulgarian composer Martin Georgiev, which premiered at the Royal Academy of Music in London in 2009, and she continues to collaborate with Georgiev on future projects.


Last Modified: 01-02-2016